TheReadingQuest- A Banned Book

“Patrick Bateman is twenty-six and works on Wall Street; he is handsome, sophisticated, charming and intelligent. He is also a psychopath. Taking us to a head-on collision with America’s greatest dream – and its worst nightmare – American Psycho is a bleak, bitter, black comedy about a world we all recognize but do not wish to confront.

American Psycho is one of the most controversial and talked-about novels of all time – a multimillion-copy bestseller hailed as a modern classic.”

Or in my own words, monotonous and irritatingly materialistic. I get that’s the point, there needs to be emphasis on how stinkingly rich the characters are, but when I’m still reading entire paragraphs describing the outfit each person in the scene is wearing 30% into a book I’m going to get bored.

I’m not a materialistic or designer worshipping type of girl myself. I knew before entering into this that there would be constant reference to money and condescension towards those less fortunate but I hadn’t realise the bulk of the book would consist of it.

Yes there is murder, there is violence. You will find exactly what you expected to, eventually.

I have to admit this is the first book that reduced me to skim reading. I didn’t find the ten plus pages outlining discographies of Whitney Houston or Genesis added to the narrative. I didn’t enjoy reading repetitive chapters full of Wall Street ‘gentleman’ arguing about where or what to eat. Though I will concede that having to do so made the violent and sexual scenes more jarring.

It is well written, the unease and discord I felt whilst reading it was, I assume, exactly what Ellis had intended.

If you are looking for some intense gore, animal abuse and lewd erotica then by all means, have at American Psycho. It is easy to see why this was a banned book.

If you prefer your stories to have a plot, or even just a beginning and an ending I don’t recommend it.

I chose this for the banned book on my path as a Rogue during TheReadingQuest by @ReadAtMidnight.

I wish I had picked A Brave New World.

418 pages read. (TRQ +41HP +10EXP)

£1.19 on Amazon Kindle (on 28/08/17)

#TheReadingQuest Sign Up

With under an hour left before sign up closes for the magical Reading Quest created by @ReadAtMidnight and illustrated by CW of ReadThinkPonder I decided this is perfect for my first ever participation in an online reading challenge!

Take a moment to investigate the game play, rules and rewards in full here: TheReadingQuest

Having discovered this only moments ago, I am wildly attempting to throw together a quick post that will get me across the deadline.

I have chosen the path of the Rogue!

rogue1

 

I will be leaving the side quests unplanned. As a Rogue, I do indeed have some hidden gems in my TBR, should I manage to squeeze extra reading time into my schedule.

I began with 20 books from varying positions in my TBR list of 178 *correct when written at 14.00 August 13th (a date also noted as 374 days prior to the dawn of my 30’s)

I have painstakingly whittled these down to 8 titles, some of which could serve as more than one tile option, we’ll see how it goes shall we?

I am still open to recommendations on my path to reading a ‘small press’ book should anybody have some for me? My usual go-to’s include SciFi, Dystopia, YA, Thriller, Horror or a classic. However for the sake of challenge, I would willingly consider any fictional recommendation!

Hit me in the comments or on Twitter.

For now I must race through the remaining 55% of my current read- Fellside by M.R.Carey so that I can join the party! Late. As Always.

Lit: My literary life timeline 1993-2013

Everyone has their own list of literature they’ve read that stayed with them for a multitude of different reasons. I’ve rooted around my memories and compiled my own. I limited myself to a maximum  of one per year so this is by no means exhaustive!

1993 (5yo): Biff, Chip & Kipper series- The Apple- Roderick Hunt is the first book I remember reading out loud whilst first learning as a child.

1994 (6yo): George’s Marvellous Medicine- Roald Dahl I was so proud of myself for pronouncing and understanding the humungerous words. ‘Gobblefunk’ (the language Dahl invented) fascinated me, though not so much my mother when I began using it colloquially.

1995 (7yo): The Twits- Roald Dahl after spending one entire Sunday morning typing out almost half of this story word-for-word on our nice new 3gb desktop computer, my parents decided to explain the term ‘plagarism’ to me. They had very much enjoyed the several hours of peace my little project had allowed them but in fact this was already someone elses work.

1996 (8yo): Watership Down- Richard Adams the first book i brought to school for ‘silent reading hour’. I wonder if that’s still a weekly classroom activity.

1997 (9yo): Bill’s New Frock – Anne Finne alarmingly, on finishing this story about a boy who wakes up one day to find everyone thinks he is a girl, our teacher asked the class if anyone felt they would prefer to have been born the opposite gender. My tomboy friend immediately raised her hand, only to have that moment never be forgotten and affect the rest of her school life.

1998 (10 yo): Goosebumps- Piano Lessons Can Be Murder- R.L. Stine thus began my first book collection.

1999 (11yo): Beowulf- Robert Nye My own creative writing description of a fight between Beowulf and Grendel came top of the class. Also the moment I discovered I’d been prounouncing ‘anxiety’ incorrectly!

2000 (12yo): To Kill A Mockingbird- Harper Lee Material for my first English essay, and my first real introduction to the meaning of racism.

2002 (14yo): The Jogger- Roger McGough Being only familiar with his works for children I was horrified after reading this poem. Even now I can’t find the words to fully convey my emotional response to it.

2004 (15yo): An Inspector Calls- J.B.Priestley I still love this play now. An oral assessment of it made up 20% of my final A grade English GCSE. It also inspired the original idea behind my first novel (currently a WIP).

2005 (17yo): IT- Stephen King my longest read until that point and, I expect, a permanent installation in my top ten favourite books.

2006 (still 17yo): Song Of Susannah- The Dark Tower Series-Stephen King I cried. 

2007 (18yo): Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows standing in line at the midnight release, trying to block out the various shouts of “Harry dies” and “They all die” or “Nobody dies”, from people leaving the store with their books held open at the final page.

2011 (23yrs): Dracula- Bram Stoker my first ebook. Downloaded onto the kindle paper view from the free -book section.

2013 (25yrs): Mad About The Boy – Bridget Jones Diaries-Helen Fielding exactly what I needed, exactly when I needed it. Including my own hilarious memory made whilst reading it during a commute to London.

 

Special mentions

Because I didn’t want to expand but I just can’t help myself:

The Help – Kathryn Stockett

Intensity – Dean Koontz

Irene/Alex/Camille – Pierre Lemaitre

The Wind In The Willows- Kenneth Grahame

 

Anyone who would like to ping back and write their own literary timeline please do. I’d be very interested to see any similarities, especially in school syllabus materials.

Thank you for reading. Feedback always welcomed.